Simple Christmas Gift Ideas For A Disabled Child

Christmas shopping for a disabled child is really hard, I struggle to think of something for William every single year!  So it’s even harder for friends and family to think of something appropriate.

That’s why I thought I’d write a very quick list of 4 things I’d be happy for William to have as gifts in the hope they might inspire you if you are looking for something to buy for a disabled child this year.

Books

William might not be able to read but he loves having a story read to him and enjoys looking at the pictures.  Personalised books are great as they let him become part of the story, and we have got a couple of personalised ones which he loves, but sadly I’ve yet to come across any which can be personalised to include a wheelchair user.

I’ve ordered Santa is bringing this book for William this year, he loves anything about dinosaurs, pants and poo!  Typical boy!

Gloves

Lets face it, we all struggle with keeping our hands warm and how many times have you lost one glove!  Kids in wheelchairs get really cold hands so gloves are a great gift. BUT… traditional, fingered gloves can be really difficult to put on.

Mittens would always be the best option but are sometimes difficult to find for older children.  These ones from Willow Bug are available in a wide variety of sizes to suit all ages.

Pajamas & Clothes

We have a tradition in our house. On Christmas eve Mrs Claus always pops by with a box for us, it usually contains a pair of PJ’s for all of us, a Christmas eve treat and it used to also have a DVD in it but these days she’s knocked that on the head and tells us to use Netflix instead!  Mrs Claus’s timing sucks though, she always seems to come when William is in the bath so he’s never been able to meet her yet!!

Clothes might be a really boring gift for a kid, but from a parent’s perspective it’s the best gift ever because it saves me from going clothes shopping!  I will never complain about William getting clothes for Christmas.  PJ’s are a lovely easy present though because we all have different tastes and styles when it comes to clothing, but that doesn’t really apply with PJ’s because they’re only worn at home.

Money

I’ve said this in a previous blog but I think money is one of the best gifts for a disabled child.  Specialist toys and equipment for disabled children don’t come cheap.  Giving money as a gift means we can save up and buy William something he really will benefit from.

William has a bank account where we save all his birthday and Christmas money so that when the time comes that he needs something expensive, we can treat him to it.   For example, his bike trailer/off road buggy cost £500 and each time he gets a new wheelchair we have to upgrade the interface board to allow his wheelchair seat to fit in the trailer, that costs another £100 each time!

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Williams Wike bike trailer converts to be a fantastic off road buggy

We’ve also spent his money on sensory lights and switch adapted toys.  Things we never would have been able to buy him on our own.

If giving money makes you feel a bit like you’ve made no effort then make it a really fun gift to open.  Wrap it in some fun paper – crinkly or sparkly paper is a great idea, or go one step further and use a space blanket which can then be used as a fun sensory experience.  William loves to lay on one and kick his legs as it makes a really loud scrunchy sound which makes him laugh!

You could even add something simple in the parcel with the cash.  A packet of bubbles or a whoopee cushion can be purchased for less than a quid and will bring lots of fun on Christmas morning.

They always say it’s the thought that counts and to me, any of these gifts would show that some thought has gone into a gift for William.

What would you add to this list?

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